How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

Culinary traditions are the essential focus point in many cultures. In fact many families celebrate and enjoy them year after year. Very often they are being taught by the elders to their children in hope they will continue them. I guess one of the biggest Culinary Traditions are the Holidays, such as Christmas, Hanukkah, New Years Eve, Easter and many more, just to name a few. The point is families have a particular ritual to cook and present their food, which makes it so interesting. Obviously religions play a vital part of traditions, too.

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

Culinary Traditions in the Caribbean with Curry Goat

Interestingly every nationality celebrates their Holidays differently from others. Whether it’s potato latkes and apple sauce for the Jewish Holidays or a roasted duck with orange juniper berries and braised red cabbage on many Christmas menus. A Caribbean Holiday tradition is to serve curry goat with green beans as well as the famous honey glazed ham we have here in the states as well.

But what is yours?

Do you have a culinary tradition that your family continues? I would be thrilled to hear what your specialty is for the Holidays. Don’t be afraid to leave a comment below. Thanks – You know I love comments.

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

A Culinary Tradition is to make Holiday Cookies

Culinary Traditions bring forward memories and rituals from our ancestors. How powerful is that? If you are in the fortunate position to ask your grand parents why and how they prepared and cooked their traditional foods, whether its for a Birthday or a holiday, you might get some answers you wouldn’t have expected.  Before I came to America I only knew about German traditions. However, I can honestly say that America is a hot spot of culinary traditions and a melting pot of fantastic multicultural cookery.  That being said; these traditions don’t always have to happen over the Holidays.

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

Germans Culinary Traditions is to serve coffee and cake in the afternoon

 

Daily Eating Habits as a Result From Culinary Traditions – It’s Tea Time!

England and Germany have one tradition in common. Tea Time – which is around 4pm in the afternoon. Although, Germans serve more coffee than tea, the ritual is very similar. Tea time in England is also called High Tea, which is served with an abundance of finger-sandwiches, scones and sometimes petis-fours like pastries. In Germany we would serve Danishes and cakes with our coffee.

 

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

Plum Cake – a German tradition

 

Kaffeeklatsch

In fact when ever I visit Germany I can’t get away from looking at the fancy pastry shops and bakeries. The first is called Konditorei and the latter is Backerei. A Konditorei offers very fancy cakes, petit fours and usually hosts a Cafe on the same premises. Many of the elderly come here and meet with friends to enjoy coffee and cake also called “Kaffeeklatsch”. That’s the time when women of age come together and chat, chat and chat :-).

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

Belegter Boden – Fruit Tart – A simple but satisfying cake

The tradition continues as coffee and cake is served in many households as it is in ours, too. It is a beautiful thing to bring the family together around 4 or 5pm, usually after work. As everyone talks about the day’s events accompanied by a good cup of coffee with a delicious piece of cake is certainly a highlight. It’s a tradition even my sons and my wife enjoy here in the States.

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

Coffee Machiato

Bakeries and pastry shops alike play a vital role in Germany as they offer a staple food in German tradition. Many bakeries now offer a few tables and a simple lunch menu with sandwiches etc. The beauty is – everyone knows everyone.  Who ever comes in says “Malzeit”, which is translated as “it’s time to eat”

If you like fancy cakes and you have the chance to visit Germany than check out a Konditorei. You’ll be glad you did.

A Bread Basket in Germany…

Another Culinary Tradition that can’t be ignored. German bread. The variety of breads offered in most Bakeries are astonishing. From the rustic sourdough, six grain, whole wheat, almond white to organic multi grain bread. There is something for everyone. The majority of breads are crispy on the outside, yet soft and moist inside. Most people here do not toast their bread unless it’s white bread. I truly love a great breadbasket with a variety of breads and rolls for breakfast. Most German breads are made from a good amount of whole grains and include a lot of fibers. Although there is an increase in outlets of large commercial bakeries throughout Germany, the quality of bread and rolls offered is superb.

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

 

 

What’s your thoughts on this?

What is your favorite family tradition and what do you cook?

Do you celebrate Culinary Traditions?

Have you heard of Coffee and Cake before?

 

How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits
How Culinary Traditions affecting our Daily Eating Habits

Comments

  1. Christmas is the strongest tradition here in New Zealand. We cook turkey and ham followed by Christmas pudding. Our traditions follow those of Great Britain. We still eat that heavy food even though it is the middle of summer here. Afternoon tea is still quite a strong tradition here and most days I will get a cup of tea at work in the middle of the afternoon and eat some of my baking. I don’t think my son will be continuing that one though.
    suzanne Perazzini recently posted..Chocolate Banana Tarts – gluten, dairy and refined sugar-freeMy Profile

  2. Memories are hard to shake, food memories most of all, I think. Christmas to me has always meant cookies – my mother would make tons, a dozen varieties at least. We don’t make that many – and give most of them away so we won’t eat them all – but it’s still fun to make some of the traditional favorites. My mother’s ancestors were German, so she had some terrific authentic recipes. Stollen was another tradition, although that’s one I usually make only every few years. Germany (and Austria) has terrific breads and pastries – maybe the best in the world, at least for my tastes. Although why choose? We can have it all! And do. ;-) Good post – thanks.
    john@kitchenriffs recently posted..Anise Drop CookiesMy Profile

  3. What a nice way to round up Christmas food memories! Thanks for your kind words. I like your expression about “why choose”. It is a blessing to prepare and cook anything you are in the mood for. If I had the time I would had a recipe post out on a daily basis.
    Frank Kraemer recently posted..Apple Plum Cake – A Favorite in GermanyMy Profile

  4. We grew up with big Christmas traditions. My mother would bake lots of cookies and cakes for Christmas. When we came home from school the fume of baked cookies greated us. I have wonderful memories of that, and I tend to continue these traditions.

  5. Luella E. Mercer says:

    Trick or treating can be traced back to European “guising” traditions where children would travel from home to home, reciting songs, jokes or poems. They didn’t say “trick or treat” back then, it was “please help the guisers” — a reference to the groups who performed plays to ward off evil spirits during Samhain, the Celtic celebration we now know as Halloween .

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